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Bosra was once the capital of the Roman Province of Arabia. Today, Bosra is considered one of the best preserved Roman ruin cities and thus is an additional important testimony of Roman life in the Region. There are also traces of Byzantinian, Arab, and other civilizations, dating back up to the fourth century BC.

We read in the Old Testament that the city was inhabited by the Amalekites (an old Semitic race coming from the Arab peninsula and living in Hauran). In 323 BC, Bosra fell under the rule of the Greeks. The Nabataeans emigrated to Bosra, built temples and high walls, and made Bosra their capital in 71 BC. Then the Romans took the city and made it the capital of their Province of Arabia. Finally, the Arabs conquered the city and entire Syria in 643 AD.

The city's most important and impressing monument is the amphitheatre offering space for 15.000 spectators, impressive acoustics and being in an astonishingly good condition. Worth-seeing are further the thermal facilities, the Nymphaeum, and the colonnade road. Everything was made of black Hauran basalt from southern Syria. Regular theatre performances and music festivals take place in the theatre of Bosra.

 

 

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